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News

THE HUNGER VIRUS IS MORE THAN THE CORONA VIRUS IN AFRICA NATIONS ESPECIALLY IN NIGERIA.

25 April 2020

HELP US TO FEED THE HELPLESS GOD IS WATCHING.

Majority of people in Africa nations now are dying of starving instead corona-virus due to government lock-down without providing any food or financial support to the general public especially the less-privileged in the community.

Thy Helper organisation is a humanitarian organisation that care for humanity especially the less-privileged in the communities. We have been providing food, safety equipment’s and  basic necessities to sustain these vulnerable people during this pandemic period to live, as saving lives is our major priority.

Nothing is too small to feed a family and keeping someone alive is guarantee for your our life. “The only true and genuine legacy we all can leave behind is good deeds”

Help us to put a smile in people’s faces because a hunger person is an angry person and together we will make the world a better place to live.

Thank you so much for your Love  and kindness through your donations!!!!!!!!! as we can go where you cannot go with your donations and contributions thank you.

care 10
IDP IMAGE2 (2)
Internaly Displaced-Persons
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13 April 2020

HALF A BILLION MORE PEOPLE COULD BE PUSHED INTO POVERTY BY CORONA VIRUS

The economic fallout from the corona virus pandemic could push half a billion more people into poverty unless urgent action is taken to support developing countries, Thy Helper warned today.

Between six and eight per cent more of the global population could be forced into poverty as governments shut down most of their economies to manage the spread of the virus.

As many as 434 million more people may be pushed into extreme poverty by the crisis – living off less than $1.90-a-day. 548 million more could fall below $5.50 a day. The crisis could set back the fight against poverty by a decade, rising to as much as 30 years in regions such as sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and North Africa. Over half the global population could be living in poverty in the aftermath of the pandemic.

The analysis was conducted by researchers at Kings College London and the Australian National University. It is published in full 09/04/2020 by the United Nations University World Institute for Development Economics Research.

Danny Sriskandarajah, Oxfam GB Chief Executive said “Right now, many people up and down the country will be feeling very anxious about money and bills. Those who have the least are being hit the hardest, and this worrying new research shows that the pandemic could force half a billion more people around the world into poverty.

“For the billions of workers in poor countries who were already scraping by – pulling rickshaws, picking tea or sewing clothes – there are no safety nets such as sick pay or government assistance. As tourists stay home, orders are cancelled and factories closed, imagine how hard it is to feed and protect your family when your income has vanished overnight.

“Our world is facing a huge challenge, but we can get through it if we pull together. Next week’s World Bank and G20 meetings are an important opportunity for world leaders to collaborate on a joint economic rescue package to protect the most vulnerable people. Immediate actions such as suspending debt repayments for developing countries would free up vital funds for healthcare and cash grants to those who have lost their income.

“The choices being made now could have profound implications for our collective future. We must build back better; permanently changing our economies to create a fairer, more sustainable world.”

Micah Olywangu, a taxi driver and father of three from Nairobi, Kenya, who has not had a fare since the lock-down closed the airport, bars and restaurants, told Oxfam that “This virus will starve us before it makes us sick.”

An economic rescue package would enable poor countries to provide cash grants to those who have lost their income and to support vulnerable, small businesses. It would be paid for through a variety of measures including:

The immediate cancellation of US$1 trillion of developing country debt payments in 2020. Cancelling Ghana’s external debt payments this year would enable the government to give a cash grant of $20 dollars a month to each of the country’s 16 million children, disabled and elderly people for a period of six months. The country is currently spending 11 times more servicing debts than on its public health

The creation of at least US$1 trillion in new international reserves, known as Special Drawing Rights, to dramatically increase the funds available to countries. This would give the Ethiopian government access to an additional $630 million – enough to increase their health spending by 45 per cent

Delivering the $2.5 trillion the UN estimates is needed to support developing countries through the pandemic would also require an additional $500 billion in overseas aid, with the international agency calling on rich countries to follow the UK’s lead in meeting its promise to provide 0.7 per cent of national income in aid.

Oxfam estimates $160 billion is needed to boost poor countries’ public health systems and $2 billion for the UN humanitarian fund. Beyond the immediate response required, all countries need to have the capacity to build back better. This will require more creative thinking on emergency solidarity taxes to make sure the poorest aren’t paying the greatest price, such as a greater taxation on wealth, an end to tax dodging, or a Financial Transaction Tax, to help avoid further entrenching the fallout of this crisis.

NOTES

The World Bank and IMF 2020 Spring meetings will take place virtually from 17-19 April.  G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors will meet virtually on 15 April.

15 January 2020

If you’re a Church, An Organisation, Musical Artist, Individual/Company.

Come and join us in these 3 days life changing program Lagos Nigeria.

Together we will make the world a better place to live.

Our mission is to help the less privileged in our communities
and we’re opened for collaboration, partnership and sponsorship.


It’s better to give than to receive and we should always give our best not to be expecting rewards from whoever we’re giving to.

NOTE:

This program is cancelled due to corona virus outbreak. When everything go back to normal, we will fix a new date for the event. Thanks for your understanding.

10 January 2020

We are looking for people to join us in fulfilling our objectives

Trustees and volunteers needed to join our organisation

Do you want to be part of dynamic charity that work to build better futures for youth especially the vulnerable and disadvantaged youths here and globally?

Job Description

About Thy Helper

Name of the organisation: Thy Helper

Main Aim of this organisation: Saving lives

Aims and Objectives of the organisation

Reg: Reg. No 12043057.  CAC Reg. No 105154.

 

Thy Helper Organisation is a non-profit and volunteer organisation registered in Nigeria 2018 and England/Wales 2019. Whose aims and objectives are to empower the youths and the general public to be more productive, reliable and dependable to themselves and the community at large.

 

Do you want to be part of dynamic charity that work to build better futures for youth especially the vulnerable and disadvantaged youths here and globally?

Who can’t legally be a charity trustee?

There are certain categories of people who are legally barred from being charity trustees such as people under 18 or people convicted of an offence involving deception or dishonesty.

WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING FOR FROM WORKERS?

Trustees and volunteers needed to join our organisation

 

Do you want to volunteer to work with us, you are most welcome and together we will transform lives of the vulnerable, especially the youths globally to say no to drugs, alcohol abuse, knife and hate crimes, help us to help the vulnerable in our communities.

Thy Helper Organisation is a non-profit and volunteer organisation, our objective is to empower the youth to be more productive, reliable and dependable to themselves and the community at large.

Thy Helper Organisation does not believe in race, colour of skin and individual belief. We believe in Love, Unity and Harmony in our communities. We are concern about the lives of the young youths especially the vulnerable in our communities. As a new charity organisation, we are looking for dedicated individuals to join our team here in UK and globally. ‘’a tree cannot make a forest’’ We believe so much in working together as a team as we have a lot to offer to the youths especially the vulnerable, to say no to knife crime, homeless, drug abusers and alcohol abusers in our local communities globally.

Within this setting, you will work to establish a culture of co-production where the youth are at the forefront of the work that is carried out, helping to promote autonomy and build individual confidence and interpersonal skills among them.

Qualities needed from trustee

  • The ability to listen and speak with people that may have difficulty to communicate with others.
  • An awareness of the professional boundaries required when working with vulnerable youth.
  • An understanding of risk management and safeguarding issues as applicable in a charity setting
  • The ability to step back and think about underlying issues that may be present when faced with difficult or troubling behaviour with these youth.
  • A willingness to go around schools as the role requires (such as visiting schools to educate the youth about dangers of substance abuse and knife crime; travel will be funded)
  • A level of resilience when faced with people who are difficult to reach
  • Flexibility to respond to the changing and challenging need of the youth and how this may impact on the weekly program design to visit each school.
  • Most be an eloquent speaker and very friendly.
  • Must be passionate about the job

We are looking for a professional and dedicated humanitarian at heart, to join our team to act in the best interests of the organisation, bringing relevant knowledge, skills and experience obtained in professional activities to any discussions.

 

Do you have skills and expertise to share with us?

The following are desirable but not essential:

Skills Requirements

  • Business development skills
  • Fundraising strategies
  • IT project management
  • Network and system management
  • Fundraising event skills
  • Legal
  • Advertising
  • Copy-writing/ Journalism
  • Software development
  • Computer support
  • Event management
  • Graphic design
  • D.O.P/ Photography
  • Social media marketing
  • Digital strategy
  • Website design
  • Website creation
  • Accountancy
  • Auditing
  • Bookkeeping
  • Financial management
  • Music production
  • Film/ video production
  • Public relation
  • Sales
  • Marketing strategy
  • Marketing research
  • Graphic design
  • Lecturing/ public speaking
  • HR
  • Health and safety
  • Project management
  • Volunteer management

NOTE

You must not necessarily have all these above qualifications before you can work with us.

The role of board of directors /trustees can be find in the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/topic/running-charity/trustee-role-board

About Volunteering can be find here

https://www.gov.uk/government/get-involved/take-part/volunteer

Practical Considerations And Benefits in working with us:

  • An opportunity to meet a wide range of people
  • A true sense of fulfilment
  • A chance to think differently about your life
  • A chance to gain significant experience
  • An opportunity to bring transformation to the lives of the vulnerable in our communities
  • An opportunity to be involved in positive and important matters
  • Free food and drinks why working with us
  • We will take care of all expenses incurred why working with us
  • Professional roles will be paid (terms and condition apply)

Expenses:

Trustees shall be reimbursed whenever possible for all reasonable travelling, subsistence and other expenses properly incurred in connection with his/her attendance at meetings or in carrying out any other duties or responsibilities of the role, but otherwise shall not be paid a remuneration.

Term:

Trustees serve a two-year term which may be renewed by the board depending on the needs and desires of the organisation and the individual trustee.

To apply, please email your full CV along with a covering letter outlining in no more than 500

words your core skills and why you would like to join our board.

info@thyhelper.org

Shortlisted candidates will be invited to interview as soon as possible.

Thank you for choosing to work with us at Thy Helper Organisation “Saving Lives”

Warm Regards,

Patrick Ekhonmun (CEO Thy Helper)

About us

15 October 2019

LET’S SHOW LOVE TO THE LESS PRIVILEGED/HOMELESS IN OUR COMMUNITIES

ALL WE NEED IS LOVE AND LOVE DOES NOT BELIEVE IN COLOUR OF YOUR SKIN

IS CHRISTMAS SEASON AGAIN AND JESUS IS THE REASON FOR THE SEASON.

AND IF YOU BELIEVE IN LOVE, JOIN THY HELPER ORGANISATION IN THIS SEASON TO PUT A

SMILE IN THE FACES OF THE HOMELESS IN LONDON

“WHOEVER LIVES IN LOVE LIVES IN GOD, AND GOD IN THEM”

Ephesians 4:2 “be completely humble and gentle; be patient, bearing with one another in love.” 1 peter 4:8 Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins” 1 Corinthians 13:13 “and now these three remain: faith, hope and love

If you want to participate in this food/clothes and gifts exercise/ you can also come with anything you have for the homeless.

COME WITH YOUR CAR IF YOU ARE DRIVING AS OTHERS MIGHT NEED LIFT. GOD BLESS YOU AS YOU SHOW LOVE TO YOUR NEIGHBOUR IN THIS SEASON OF CHRISTMAS.

TO MAKE A DONATION TOWARDS THIS ART OF LOVE TO THE HOMELESS IN OUR COMMUNITY.

Name: thy helper organisation

SORT CODE: 30-96-85

ACCOUNT: 55227568

DATE: 25/12/2019.  MEETING POINT: OPPOSITE WOOLWICH TRAIN STATION. (THE OPEN FIELD) COME ONE!!! COME ALL!!!

Call: 07934050517 or email us: info@thyhelper.org

Time: 11:00am-2:30pm

THIS FELLOW IS A HUMAN LIKE ME AND YOU. HOMELESSNESS DOES NOT MAKE YOU LESS HUMAN. HE NEEDS OUR LOVE AND CARE. SHOW THE HOMELESS SOME LOVE IN THIS SEASON AND TOGETHER WE WILL MAKE THE WORLD A BETTER PLACE TO LIVE. LITTLE IS BETTER THAN NOTHING

DON’T JUDGE PEOPLE BY THEIR PHYSICAL APPEARANCE WHEN THEIR MIND IS MESSED UP. THEY NEED OUR HELP AND SUPPORT. SHOW THEM SOME LOVE IN THIS FESTIVE PERIOD AND EVERY OTHER TIME FOR LOVE AND CARE DOES IS NOT SEASONAL…….

20 November 2018

THY HELPER FULL DOCUMENTARY VIDEO IS OUT AND YOU CAN WATCH IT DIRECTLY FROM HERE

22 January 2018

EVENT FOR THE HOMELESS AND EMERGENCY SERVICE

Free Christmas Dinner

OUTCOME OF THE DINNER PARTY ORGANISED FOR THE HOMELESS AND THE EMERGENCY SERVICE PRESTON 25 DECEMBER 2018.

Christmas dinner party for the homeless and emergency services.
Call it show up or whatever, we call this act of Love for humanity especially the vulnerable. This’s how Thy Helper Organisation in collaboration with FASTMOVERS delivery services and our partner Roast cooked to perfection in Preston England celebrate Christmas today 25/12/2018 by organising a Free food dinner party and presentation of gift items to the homeless in our community Preston England.

Thy Helper Christmass Dinner

04 February 2017

BEWARE OF THIS DEADLY DRUG  KROKODIL

Flesh-eating drug Krokodil is sweeping the UK – leaving addicts with rancid rotting flesh, open pus-filled sores and scaly skin
Krokodil has been branded “the world’s deadliest drug” and now the substance – which makes users’ skin flake away like a crocodile – has hit Britain.
ROTTING flesh, scaly skin and pus-filled gaping wounds… these symptoms may sound like something straight out of a horror film.
But this year has seen several cases of British living with these life-threatening injuries in secret – after becoming addicted to a new flesh-eating drug known as Krokodil, which experts say is “one of the worst drugs in the world.”

The dangerous substance – which can be homemade from a deadly concoction of household products – costs just a few pounds and creates a high like that of heroin.
Krokodil — Russian for crocodile — turns the skin green and scaly around the area where it’s injected as blood vessels burst and the skin rots away.

Tanya pictured after using Krokodil for several months)

Horrifyingly, the deadly substance — which originated in Russia around a decade ago as a cheap alternative to heroin — is now set to take hold here in the UK, with desperate users being able to make it for a tenth of the price.
A woman in her forties was unable to attend Cheltenham Magistrates’ Court in August after taking the Class A substance, which is ten times more powerful than heroin.
Her barrister told the court the unnamed woman was being treated for “horrific” open sores in Gloucestershire Royal Hospital.
Last year, Somerset’s Taunton Deane Borough Council also reported problems with the drug, with a housing officer admitting: “the effects of the drug are so severe that addicts’ behaviour is untenable in hostels.”
Flesh-eating Krokodil drug that leaves addicts with scaly wounds like crocodile skin is now in the UK
Doctors estimate that from the point an addict first takes Krokodil, their life expectancy is a little over two years.

But why is the drug on the rise?
A killer drug cooked up in the kitchen
Alarmingly, Krokodil is extremely quick and simple to make.
Chemistry lecturer Dr Simon Cotton from the University of Birmingham says: “It’s very easy to make Krokodil.
“It’s a one step process that can be done on a stove and it can be stewed up in under an hour
“The problem is, it’s not been purified so the crude product is injected.
“That means people aren’t just injecting the drug and this is what seems to cause the side effects including thrombosis, gangrene, abscesses and scaly skin which goes green and black – much like a crocodile.”
Krokodil – also known as dorsomorphin and the “zombie drug”- has been compared to already established drug epidemics like spice and heroin – but experts say it’s even more dangerous.

Speaking to The Sun Online, Chemist Click pharmacist Abbas Kanani says: “Without any exaggeration, Krokodil is probably one of the worst drugs in the world.
“The high from Krokodil doesn’t last as long as the high from heroin, so users inject more frequently.
“Cost-wise, this won’t deter users as it’s around 10 times cheaper than heroin.
“It’s concerning when any drug is made at home as there are no quality control measures in place.
“This means that the non-sterile method used to prepare drugs can cause an infection and sharing needles can increase the chances of transmitting infections such as HIV and hepatitis.”

‘I could see the tendons moving in his rotting arm’
While these recent reports are an indication that the drug is becoming more high profile, they aren’t the first reports of Krokodil in the UK.
Gloucester-based doctor Allan Harris described in 2013 what he’d experienced first-hand when treating a patient who’d taken Krokodil.
He told Vice: “…it actually took out a huge crater of all the forearm muscle.
“When you took out the dead tissue you could actually see the tendons moving at the base of this crater and the bones as well.
“They put a free skin graft over the top, which all healed alright, but it was horrendous.
“The muscles never grew back because they were completely gangrenous.”
Hundreds of Russians have become addicted to the deadly drug over the past decade
The UK’s next epidemic
There are thousands of reported deaths in other countries where its use is more prevalent, like Russia, and experts warn that this could become a serious threat here, as virtually anyone can make the drug.

What is krokodil (desomorphine)?

Desomorphine, known by the street name krokodil, is an opioid derivative of codeine. Like heroin and other opioids, it has a sedative and analgesic effect and is highly addictive. Those who inject these caustic agents into their veins can develop extreme skin ulcerations, infections, and gangrene — a discolored (green, grey, black) scale-like skin that resembles a crocodile, hence the street name “krokodil”. Krokodil is also called “Russian Magic”, referring to its short duration of opioid intoxication (euphoria).
Krokodil is reported to contain desomorphine, a synthetic morphine analogue synthesized in the 1930s. Due to illicit, home-based manufacturing it may contain other unknown ingredients. It is typically abused via the intravenous route. Desomorphine is a Schedule I substance in the U.S., meaning it has high abuse potential with no accepted medical use.

Homemade versions of the drug start with codeine and can be ‘cooked’ similar to illicit methamphetamine (“meth”) production. Organic solvents such as gasoline, paint thinner, or lighter fluid, iodine, hydrochloric acid, and red phosphorus (from matches) are used in homemade synthesis. These dangerous chemicals are not always fully “cooked” out of the concoction when used to make illicit krokodil. Krokodil also refers to chlorocodide, a codeine derivative in the synthetic path to desomorphine.

What is the extent of krokodil use?

Krokodil has been synthesized in Russia for over a decade. About one million people in Russia use krokodil according to the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services. Krokodil goes by the names of “Cheornaya” in Russia and “Himiya” in Ukraine. According to the head of the Russian Federal Drug Control Service, the amount of krokodil seized in Russia increased 23-fold between 2009 and 2011. Krokodil has also been reported in other countries including the Ukraine, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Germany and Norway.
Previously in Russia and Ukraine, Afghan heroin was the drug of choice when making homemade injectables. Due to a possible Afghan opium crop fungal disease in 2010, the production of opium was 48 percent lower than the previous year. Therefore, in Eurasia, users turned to over-the-counter medications that contain codeine for pain or cough (e.g. Solpadeine, Codterpin or Codelac) as an ingredient for krokodil. Codeine is preferred instead of heroin because of lower costs and ease of availability. However, the medications combined with the codeine such as acetaminophen or terpin hydrate, their effect on the chemical reactions, and their ultimate contribution to the toxicity of krokodil are all unknown. In some former Soviet Union regions, officials attribute at least half of all drug-related deaths due to krokodil.

In the U.S., codeine is a controlled substance and either requires a prescription or may be available over-the-counter from the pharmacist (as with some cough syrups) with restrictions in some states. There were few reports of krokodil use in the U.S. until September 2013 when a poison control center in Phoenix, Arizona received inquiries about the product. Additional reports have surfaced from Illinois and Oklahoma. However, as of October 2013, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) has stated that they are skeptical that krokodil has crossed American borders. The DEA notes that they have not seen any cases of it, and nothing has been turned into their laboratories. To have official confirmation, the DEA would require a drug sample. Users in America may unknowingly buy krokodil off the streets under the assumption they are buying heroin.
Is krokodil addictive?

Addiction is an obvious problem with krokodil use due to its high opioid potency and short duration of effect. Frequent administration may lead to binge patterns that can last for days. Users are at increased risk for exhaustion due to sleep deprivation, memory loss, and problems with speech. Variations in potency or “homemade” recipes can put users at increased risk of overdose.
According the  DEA, repeated administration of desomorphine with short intervals in cancer patients with severe pain showed that desomorphine produced a high degree of addiction liability.
Another less obvious risk with krokodil use is that those who are afflicted with gangrene and other side effects may delay seeking much-needed medical treatment due to fear of legal action. In addition, the desire for continued krokodil administration to prevent withdrawal effects may prevent users from presenting for treatment.

What are the side effects of krokodil?

 

According to reports, the drug is fast-acting within 2 to 3 minutes and 10 to 15 times more potent than morphine, and three times as toxic. In fact, when the toxic chemicals are removed, quite often what is left is desomorphine, a compound very similar to heroin. After a rapid onset, the euphoric effects may last less than two hours. Due to the short duration of the “high”, many users find themselves in a rapid repetition of drug use to avoid withdrawal symptoms that resemble heroin. Due to the drug’s rapid onset but short duration of action and frequent administration, quick physical dependence may occur.
There have been multiple unconfirmed news reports of users in the U.S. who have had extreme skin ulcerations, infections and scale-like skin due to use of krokodil. Indeed, the most common complications reported thus far from krokodil injection appears to be the serious vein damage, soft tissue infections, necrosis and gangrene. According to reports, the localized soft tissue effects occur relatively quickly after the use of krokodil. There have been news reports of amputations. It appears that ulcerations may occur locally at the drug injection site or also at remote areas of the body. There may be further organ or central nervous system damage.

Reported health hazards due to krokodil injection use include:

  • Blood vessel damage (thrombophlebitis)
  • Open ulcers, gangrene
  • skin and soft tissue infections
  • Need for skin grafts and surgery
  • Limb amputations
  • Pneumonia
  • Blood poisoning
  • Meningitis
  • Rotting gums or tooth loss
  • Blood-borne virus transmission (HIV and HCV due to needle sharing)
  • Bone infections (osteomyelitis) and osteonecrosis
  • Speech and motor skills impairment
  • Memory loss and impaired concentration
  • Liver and kidney damage
  • Overdose
  • Powerful respiratory depressant effect
  • Death

05 March 2016

Volunteers and employment rights

Who are volunteers?
Volunteers give time, carrying out activities that aim to benefit community or society. Volunteers are unpaid and choose how they wish to give their time. Volunteering takes place in every sector from charities and not for profits to the public and private sector. The activities volunteers take part in are diverse, ranging from campaigning and fundraising to mentoring and befriending, running events and sports clubs to more formal roles like trusteeships. While trustees have legal obligations toward the charities they govern, there is no legal definition of ‘volunteer’, and this includes trustees.
Volunteers have fewer rights and less legal protection than paid staff, because relevant legislation – such as the Equality Act 2010 and the Employment Rights Act 1996 – does not apply to volunteers. There have, however, been some rare cases in which volunteers successfully claimed such rights by showing that, from a legal point of view, they had an employment relationship with their organisation.
Volunteers should, of course, be treated fairly and with respect. An organisation that treated volunteers badly would struggle to keep volunteers, and face negative publicity. Organisations should know about volunteering good practice, and get support and resources from NCVO and local volunteer centres to make sure they use the right structures and approach.
Equality Act 2010
The Equality Act 2010 combined previous anti-discrimination legislation into one act of parliament. The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) said it ‘simplifies, strengthens and harmonises the current legislation to provide Britain with a new discrimination law which protects individuals from unfair treatment and promotes a fair and more equal society’.
The act protects people from discrimination on specified grounds (called ‘protected characteristics’) in employment and when using goods and services. However, volunteers generally don’t fall into either of these categories. They’re not included in the definition of employment in the Equality Act 2010:
‘Employment’ means … employment under a contract of employment, a contract of apprenticeship or a contract personally to do work.
See the employment status and volunteers section for more on the definition of employment and the rare cases where volunteers can be seen as employees.
The possibility that volunteering could be seen as akin to receipt of a service provision has been raised from time to time. Legal opinion is that such a claim is highly unlikely to be successful.
When does the Equality Act 2010 apply to volunteers?
Organisations may be responsible for their volunteers’ discriminatory actions under the Equality Act 2010. Although volunteers are not employees, the organisation has asked them to act on its behalf.
EHRC guidance says:
… it is likely that you will be seen as acting on behalf of the organisation you are volunteering for. This means that if you break equality law by unlawfully discriminating against a client or service user, both you and the organisation could be held legally responsible for what you have done.
Organisations won’t necessarily be liable if a volunteer has ignored training or guidance, but the organisation should notice and rectify mistakes or problems as soon as possible or they may become party to the discrimination.
An organisation may be liable if a volunteer harasses an employee. Employers must take reasonable steps to stop employees being harassed. Organisations must show that they have taken reasonable steps to make sure that volunteers know about equality issues and do not discriminate towards service users or harass employees.
Tips for making sure volunteers know about equality issues
Include volunteers in your equal opportunities policy (to an appropriate extent, for instance making it clear that any cross-references to employee policies such as the disciplinary policy will not apply).
Discuss equality issues with volunteers in their inductions. Make sure they understand the organisation’s commitments and responsibilities, and will meet these.
Have clearly defined role descriptions that set out the boundaries of volunteers’ roles and responsibilities.
If volunteers will be working with beneficiaries or service users, give adequate training on equality issues in the context of their work.
Make sure there is enough supervision, communication and monitoring to keep an eye on day-to-day behaviour, and take action if issues arise.
Give each volunteer a named supervisor to go to with questions or concerns, so that they never have to work beyond their role or training.
Make sure service users and volunteers have clear ways to raise complaints or concerns, so that mistakes can be swiftly put right.
Bullying/harassment and volunteers’ rights
Although volunteers don’t have the same rights as employees, they may have some rights if they have an emotionally harmful or threatening experience.
Here are two theoretical examples of this. However, we’re not aware of any incidents in which either example has happened.
Health and safety
If poor treatment of a volunteer has caused demonstrable emotional harm, and the organisation broke its duty of care or duties under the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, it could be treated as a health and safety issue.
To be liable, the organisation would need to have failed to take reasonable steps to keep the volunteer safe.
In general, harm has to be foreseeable – for example, if the organisation knew or should have known that the volunteer was being exposed to risks to their mental health. Such cases are very hard to prove.
Harassment
A volunteer could use the Protection from Harassment Act 1997. This law was introduced to stop stalking, but it has been used by employees in cases of harassment in the workplace.
A ‘course of conduct which amounts to harassment of another’ – which means alarm, anxiety or distress is caused at least twice – is a criminal offence under the Act. In the case of Majrowski v Guy’s and St Thomas’s NHS Trust, the House of Lords found that the employer was ‘vicariously liable’ for the behaviour of a bullying line manager.
It’s hard to know when behaviour counts as harassment, but the Court of Appeal did note in a later case that it must be of a serious nature, where ‘the conduct is of such gravity as to justify the sanctions of the criminal law’ (Conn v Council of the City of Sunderland).
This law is not limited to employees, so it could be applied by volunteers.

07 March 2016

THE FOLLOWING ROLES ARE AVAILABLE IF YOU WANT TO JOIN OUR TEAM

 

Do you want to volunteer to work with us, you are most welcome and together we will transform lives of the vulnerable, especially the youths globally to say no to drugs, alcohol abuse, knife and hate crimes, help us to help the vulnerable in our communities.
Thy Helper Organisation is a non-profit and volunteer organisation whose aims, and objectives is to empower the youths to be more productive, reliable and dependable to themselves and the community at large.
Thy Helper Organisation does not believe in race, colour of skin and individual belief. We believe in Love, Unity and Harmony in our communities. We are concern about the lives of the young youths especially the vulnerable in our communities. As a new charity organisation, we are looking for dedicated individuals to join our team here in UK and globally. ‘’a tree cannot make a forest’’ We believe so much in working together as a team as we have a lot to offer to the youths especially the vulnerable, homeless, drug abusers and alcohol abusers in our local communities globally.

The following roles are available (Volunteer and paid, terms and condition applies)

• D.O.P (director of photography)
• Publicity (PR)
• IT
• Board of Trustees

• Board of Directors
• Office Administrator
• Secretary
• Event Managers

• Chefs
• Kitchen Assistance
• Fund Raising Assistance
• General Volunteers
• Make up artist

Benefits in working with us

• An opportunity to meet a wide range of people
• A true sense of fulfilment
• A chance to think differently about your life
• A chance to gain significant experience
• An opportunity to bring transformation to the lives of the vulnerable in our communities

• An opportunity to be involved in positive and important matters
• Free food and drinks why working with us
• We will take care of all expenses incurred why working with us
• Professional roles will be paid (terms and condition applies)

The role of board of directors /trustees can be find in the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/topic/running-charity/trustee-role-board

To apply for the follow roles, forward your current CV to info@thyhelper.org 

6 March 2020.

YOUR ORGANISATION AND CORONA-VIRUS

 

This information is intended to help you decide what steps you and your organisation may need to take in light of the spread of the covid-19 virus.

We’ll keep this information up to date. This page was last updated on 6 March 2020.

What is the corona-virus?

A corona-virus is a type of virus. As a group, corona-viruses are common across the world. This strain, covid-19, is a new strain of corona-virus first identified in Wuhan City, China in January 2020.

What are the symptoms?

The following symptoms may develop in the 14 days after exposure to someone who has covid-19 infection:

  • A cough
  • A high temperature
  • Shortness of breath

If you are worried about symptoms, please call NHS 111 or go to the NHS 111 corona-virus advice website. Do not go directly to your GP or other healthcare environment.

The latest advice and developments on the covid-19 situation can be found on the GOV.UK website.

What’s the best way to prevent the spread of covid-19?

Wash your hands often with soap (or soap substitutes) and water for at least 20 seconds or use an alcohol-based hand sanitiser. This is particularly important after taking public transport.

Use an alcohol-based hand sanitiser that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available.

Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in a bin. You can download a ’Catch it, Bin it, Kill it’ poster (PDF, 940KB) for your workplace from the NHS.

Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces in the home and work environment.

Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

What do we need to do to protect staff, volunteers and visitors?

Information: Provide clear information using communication channels including posters and email.

Hand washing facilities: Hand washing facilities should be available and well supplied. More regular hand washing may require more supplies. Provide hand sanitiser, tissues and cleaning products around your buildings for staff and visitors. GOV.UK has published clear and printable instructions on hand washing techniques (PDF, 130KB) which can be displayed around the workplace.

Cleaning regimes: Viruses can live on hard surfaces for up to eight hours. Frequently clean key areas including keyboards and door handles.

There is government advice on social care and educational settings you may want to review if they apply to your organisation.

Support staff working from home: Staff and volunteers may be required to work from home, particularly if impacted by school closures. Consideration should be given to the infrastructure, equipment and processes required to allow staff to work remotely. These considerations include secure, remote access to servers, video conferencing facilities and guidance on home working.

Manage travel risks: Keep up to date on current travel advice. The Foreign Office has published information and advice on travel safety and the World Health Organisation is providing updated covid-19 travel advice.

Review travel arrangements. Is travel necessary? Are there possible alternatives such as video conferencing? Maintain updated and clear advice for staff travelling.

If UK staff or volunteers are working overseas consider what access they have to health care services.

Ensure emergency contact details are up to date

For specific HR-related corona-virus enquires, NCVO members can contact Croner

Should our employees take sick leave?

There is no need for most staff or volunteers to avoid the workplace.

The government has listed high risk areas/countries by category 1 (highest risk areas) and category 2 areas.

Employees who are symptom less but have returned from category 1 areas within the last 14 days should self-isolate for 14 days from their return.

Employees who have returned from a category 2 area within the last 14 days and who develop symptoms should self-isolate.

Employees who are recommended to self-isolate are entitled to sick leave but not necessarily sick pay, though you may well want to provide this anyway as a matter of being a good employer.

If employees are sick with the virus then they would qualify for Statutory Sick Pay subject to meeting eligibility requirements.

Further advice on employee sick leave and sick pay entitlements can be found on the Acas website.

Our HR consultancy Trusted Supplier Croner has also compiled answers to frequently asked questions about covid-19, including self-isolation and sick pay.

Should we cancel our events?

Currently the advice is for most people to continue to go to work, school and other public places.

If your charity is planning events which will bring together large numbers of people, keep your plans under review. If your events depend on volunteers, be aware that some may prefer to stay home.

How do we support our beneficiaries/service users?

Generally, infections can cause more severe symptoms in people with weakened immune systems, older people, and those with long-term conditions like diabetes, cancer and chronic lung disease. See below for resources from charities for different groups.

Some of your service users or beneficiaries may be more at risk or highly concerned about the virus.

You can play a role in providing clear and updated information to raise awareness of prevention measures like hand washing, but at this stage the most important message may simply be one of reassurance.

NCVO will be working alongside the NHS and the Health and Well being Alliance on how best to support vulnerable service users and people in our communities, and we’ll keep NCVO members updated with the latest information on this.

How do we support members of communities facing discrimination?

Members of some communities are experiencing acts of racism, discrimination and verbal abuse with the outbreak of the virus.

Covid-19 does not discriminate and the containment or spread of the virus is not based on ethnicity.

These communities must feel supported and know that these acts of discrimination should not be tolerated.

Stop Hate UK are providing anyone experiencing or witnessing such discrimination with a confidential 24-hour third-party reporting service.

How will we develop a contingency plan and how will our insurance be impacted?

You should think about how your organisation would run if a significant proportion of staff or volunteers were unavailable, or if you had to work from home. Who will make decisions about your operations, how and when? This checklist from Trusted Supplier Zurich Insurance (PDF, 290KB) helps you think through some of the issues and plan for them. The Charities Facility Management Group has more information on how to develop a business continuity plan.

Every insurance policy will have varying terms and conditions so you should check directly with your insurance company or broker.

The Association of British Insurers has released a statement regarding the declaration from the government that the corona virus is a ‘notifiable disease’.

Will there be financial implications?

You and your board may want to consider potential financial impacts of the virus’s spread continuing, and what steps you might need to take.

 

You may want to budget for increased contingency costs over the next financial year:

Your income may fall if there is serious disruption.

You may face increased need for support from people who rely on your organisation.

The value of investments has been affected by the scale of the virus. This is likely to be a particular concern if you have shorter-term investments.

You may also face increased costs if the impact on global trade continues.

The Institute of Fundraising has developed guidance for fundraisers in relation to Covid-19.

How are charities helping to deal with covid-19?

Diabetes UK has provided an updated information page for people living with diabetes.

Asthma UK has released a blog post with advice for people with asthma.

The British Heart Foundation has published guidance for people with health problems.

The National Eczema Society has offered advice on hand washing techniques for people with eczema and other skin conditions.

SignHealth has created British Sign Language (BSL) videos to help deaf BSL users either working in charities or receiving support.

Carers UK has produced recommendations for carers.

Housing Justice has issued specialised advice to homeless shelters. Glass Door is emphasising the importance of hand washing and has boosted their stock of hand gels kept in their vans that move between shelters. Pathway and Crisis have called on the government for guidance on how best to protect homeless people against corona-virus.

Full Fact has generated a fact check page on covid-19 to help dispel any false information.

The Cystic Fibrosis Trust, Primary Immunodeficiency UK and the Mental Health Foundation have all issued advice and support.

Resources

Key up-to-date information from the government:

GOV.UK: COVID-19 latest information and advice

NHS corona-virus advice

Sector-specific guidance

GOV.UK: Guidance for social or community care and residential settings on COVID-19

GOV.UK: COVID-19 guidance for educational settings

NHS England: Corona-virus information for health professionals

Risk management

GOV.UK: Guidance on charities and risk management

Zurich: Organisational resilience guidance on pandemic planning

Charities Facilities Management Group: Business continuity for charities

Travel advice

GOV.UK: COVID-19 travel advice

GOV.UK: COVID-19 specified countries and areas with implications for returning travellers or visitors arriving in the UK

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-specified-countries-and-areas/covid-19-specified-countries-and-areas-with-implications-for-returning-travellers-or-visitors-arriving-in-the-uk

24 March 2020

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